Celebrating Saint Andrew and Ordination


Today, November 30th, is Saint Andrew’s day. It is the last major feast in the church calendar before the beginning of Advent. Among other things, Saint Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland. If you click on the link above you will find how that came about.

Andrew is one of the twelve apostles. He is the younger brother of Peter. A figure in the background of his older, more visible brother. As the youngest of six boys, I can relate to the idea of being in the shadow of older, more voluble, brothers.

Saint Andrew's oatmeal

I kicked off my Saint Andrew’s day celebration with a good, hearty bowl of oatmeal.

Not surprisingly, as a guy named McKenzie, I have an affinity with the patron saint of Scotland. My great-great-grandfather on my dad’s side emigrated from Biggar, Scotland. My great-grandfather, Fighting Mac, made his reputation as an Australian, and my grandfather, Gordon, migrated to Canada, where my dad was born.

So, that’s the ancestral connection to Saint Andrew. I have another connection as well. Continue reading

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Communion Bread for Easter


I have a confession to make. I really don’t like Communion Wafers. I appreciate that they are good to take when I go on a hospital visit. They are a whole lot less messy. However, when celebrating the Eucharist with the parish I want a good Communion Bread.

I’m not planning on getting to arguments here about whether Christ really is or isn’t in the bread we eat and the wine we drink. However, I found it interesting in today’s reading for Acts 10, when Peter is telling Cornelius about Jesus’s Resurrection, he mentions that Jesus didn’t appear to everyone, only those who had eaten and drank with him. I think the celebration of the Lord’s Supper, should revolve around substantial food, (you can argue amongst yourselves whether it be trans or con).

This is one of the things I appreciate about the Eucharist at St. Margaret’s. They almost always use real Communion Bread. Two years ago I did a Lenten study on bread making as a spiritual discipline. It was taught by Ryan Stoesz a parishioner of St. Margaret’s and a baker at Tall Grass Prairie at the Forks.

Our last session involved the making of Communion Bread. The bread I made I used for the Easter service at St. Mark’s one of the parishes I serve. This year at St. Philip’s we were holding several baptisms as part of our Easter celebrations. I decided to make the bread for the service. Ryan’s recipe is below, and I have some pictures of the process.

Communion bread honey and oil

Honey and cold-press sunflower oil for the Communion Bread.

Communion Bread:

3c white flour
2c whole wheat flour
1.5tsp salt
2tbsp sunflower oil
2tbsp honey
Enough water to make a firm and dense dough. Approx. 2c, but could be more or less.

Continue reading