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Reviews and Such Books

Brillat-Savarin – The Physiology of Taste

The Physiology of Taste, by Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, is arguably the most famous food book ever written. First published in 1825, and almost 200 years later, it’s still in print. It’s best known translation is the one by M.F.K. Fisher. I didn’t purchase that one. From comments I’ve read, that edition is famous as much for Fisher’s commentary as Brillat-Savarin’s own writing. While now known primarily for his food writing, Brillat-Savarin spent most of his adult life as a politician serving…Continue readingBrillat-Savarin – The Physiology of Taste

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Reviews and Such Books

Standage: An Edible History of Humanity

I’ve always been a bit of a history buff. So, when I started writing about food, I naturally found myself reading books about food history. There seems to be an increasing number of writers looking back at how our eating habits have shaped our communities. Some even going back to the beginning of time. Some of these books such as Catching Fire by Richard Wrangham take cover vast areas of history and geography. Others, such as Pepper, by Marjory Shaffer cover a long…Continue readingStandage: An Edible History of Humanity

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Books Reviews and Such

Alice, Let’s Eat – Calvin Trillin

“The primary requisite for writing well about food is a good appetite.” A. J. LieblingCalvin Trillin, author of Alice, Let’s Eat, is a writer clearly convinced of the wisdom of Liebling’s dictum.  Alice, Let’s Eat, subtitled Further Adventures of A Happy Eater, recounts Trillin’s love of food, and the lengths, generally humorous, that he would go to, to obtain great food. Alice Let’s Eat Trillin falls into a line of American humorists that runs from Twain, Rogers, and Liebling himself, through…Continue readingAlice, Let’s Eat – Calvin Trillin