Pastry Castle – Edmonton Street


A couple of months ago, I was walking down Edmonton Street, and noticed that the storefront next door to the Magic Room had brown paper up on the windows and that there writing suggesting that the Pastry Castle would be opening soon. After I posted a picture of this, I discovered that it was a new location for the cafe, as it had originally existed in St. Vital.

I kept my eyes open, and one evening I was walking by the building and noticed that the open sign was lit. I walked in, and couldn’t see anyone around. I thought maybe I had walked in a couple of minutes after closing time, and that they just hadn’t turned out the lights and locked the door.

Pastry Castle Biscotti.

An almond biscotti from Pastry Castle. How it got the green colour I’m not quite sure, but the flavour wasn’t affected.

I waited for 4 or 5 minutes and still no one showed. So, I looked up the number on the website, and phoned. The phoned was answered and when I said I was in the cafe and wondering whether or not it was open, It turned out it was and a woman came out of the back area of the store to serve me.

Pastry Castle Oatmeal Date Cookie

A date filled oatmeal cookie. The top view doesn’t show the date, but it was nicely filled.

On subsequent visits, I noticed there is an electronic announcement that informs the staff that someone has entered the building. I guess it wasn’t working on my first visit.

I decided to stay and so I took a look at what was on display. There is a good variety of baked goods in the cabinet. One of the things that I noticed was there was a good selection of little cookies, which I really liked. Continue reading

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More Crime and Cuisine


I’m taking a bit of a break from the series I just started, to do an addition to another topic that I beg a while ago. A couple of months ago, i wrote a post on some of my favourite fictional detective figures where food plays a significant roles in either the stories or character development.

On a whim, when I tweeted the post I tagged Ian Rankin, creator of Rebus, my favourite detective, lack of food narrative notwithstanding, Surprisingly, he answered back my tweet, and even included a couple of other notes. One was making note of Hamish Macbeth, and Agatha Raisin, by MC Beation, and the other was that there exists a whole sub-genre of, largely American, writers whose mysteries include recipes at the end of each chapter.

MC Beaton

When Ian Rankin recommends a mystery writer, there is no choice but to take the time to check that writer out.

One of the writers that came up in the comments to the last post was Martin Walker, and his Bruno Chief of Police series. I have started reading that series and I will be writing about him, but I intend to give Bruno his own post, which I’m going to connect to the idea of French Cuisine. For now, all I’ll say is, if you can get your hand on the Bruno books make sure you do.

One character I left off the list is Jim Qwilleran, from Lillian Jackson Braun’s The Cat Who series. Although the cats are the main focus of the series, Qwilleran proves himself to be quite adept in the kitchen.

Baking, Catering, and Crime Solving

It was reading Diane Mott Davidson’s Catering to Nobody, that got me started on this crime and cuisine jag. I don’t know if she is the start of the genre, but she is clearly marked out as one of the best in the genre. Joanne Fluke is another author who has achieved a great deal of success in this genre.  Continue reading

Advent Potluck & Church Dinners


Church meals are of great interest to me. I think they are one of the most important activities a church community can engage in. I’m fortunate that I’m part of two groups that regularly feature a meal as part of their gathering time. As well, St. Philip’s. where I’m incumbent has weekly coffee time along with BBQs and occasional other dinners.

One of those dinners is our annual Advent Potluck which we hold each year on the Third Sunday of Advent. This year the potluck occurred the Sunday after I was scheduled to make supper for the Saint Magaret’s Saturday evening service. Then, the four o’clock “Kid’s Church” that meets at St. Philip’s was having a service followed by the usual soup and bread supper.

Advent weekend breakfast

French Toast with grilled pears, blackberries, caramel sauce, and creme fraiche, from Little Goat Food & Drink

Needless to say, such a weekend requires a great deal of fortitude, both to cook and to eat. So, I figured that I needed to start my Saturday off with a bit of stretching. Stomach stretching that is. I figured a good, solid breakfast would ensure that I would be prepared to consume large amounts of food throughout the weekend.

Fortunately, Little Goat Food & Drink has recently opened. Continue reading

Saint Ignatius Fall Fish Fry


Each year as I compile my Fall Suppers list, I’m always on the lookout for new suppers to add. Since the season runs until about the middle of November, I keep up the search well after I’ve originally posted. This year one of the new dinners that I came upon was the Fall Fish Fry at Saint Ignatius Church.

Saint Ignatius Knights of Columbus place mats

The placemats with the Knights of Columbus logo on it.

Saint Ignatius Church is founded in memory of Saint Ignatius, the founder of the Jesuits. Among other things, the Jesuits are known as the scholar priests of the Catholic Church. In addition to the church Saint Ignatius is also home to a school running from nursery to Grade 8.

This parish is one place that despite going past it hundreds of times while living in Winnipeg, I’ve never visited. I’ve worked with people whose children have attended the school, and I’ve had friends and parishioners who have taken part in the Spiritual exercises and the healing ministry course, but never made it there myself. Continue reading