2017 Winnipeg Fall Suppers


It’s that time of the year again. Time to start thinking and planning ahead for fall suppers. I decided to try and get This year’s Winnipeg 2017 Fall Suppers post is my third annual. As always, I encourage you to check out Orest Kinasevych to find out the locations and times for fall suppers outside of the city. Again, I appreciate people sending me the information on dinners that occur outside of down, but if you wish for advertising for it, please contact Orest.

The list for 2017 is as always, a work in progress. You can leave information for any Winnipeg 2017 Supper that you’d like to see in the comments below email me at macbubs13 at gmail dot com. The number of dinners on the list grew last year, and I’d like to see it get even larger this year. One thing I’d like to see in 2017 is whether or not there are any community dinners hosted by members of newcomers to Canada. If you know of any such dinner please let me know.

Fall Supper centerpiece

A centerpiece from the St. Francis Anglican Church Fall Supper

You’ll notice that like last year there is a mix of style and pricing to these suppers. I hope to appeal to people in a broad range of financial positions, but also to give people the opportunity to learn about many great organizations operating in Winnipeg. It may seem like they are all quite expensive, but once you get past the first few weeks, there are many more that fit a more limited budget. Continue reading

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Keeping the Ferial


A post from six and half years ago, with a bit of an update.

Dining with Donald

I wrote this post six and a half years ago. I’m reposting it with some change in my thoughts. Not that I necessarily disagree with what I wrote, but that I find my approach to some matters a little changed in the interim.

I’ve just started reading Robert Farrar Capon’s The Supper of the Lamb.” Although listed as a cookbook, it could perhaps better be described as a memoir with recipes.  Capon, a retired Episcopal priest from the U.S, has written a book that brings together two of his loves, theology and food.   There is much of substance in this book and I believe I will be writing several posts about it by the time I have completed it.

However, my attention has already been arrested by the material in the third chapter, where Capon is talking about festal and ferial eating.  Festal eating is that eating which surrounds…

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Fringe Fest 1


This is my review of the original production of Padre X. I really encourage you to go see this show if you can. It’s excellent.

Dining with Donald

Marc A. Moir is remounting Padre X at this year’s Winnipeg Fringe. This is the review I wrote of the original production.

During the first twenty-seven years of my life here in Winnipeg I likely attended three Fringe Festival plays in total.  Two years ago I went to three during one season and last year upped that total to five.  The increase was largely due to the number of plays that friends of mine were participating in, either as writers, actors, stage managers, etc.  This year I decided I would get the frequent fringer pass which allows me to see 10 plays for $69, a substantial savings over 10 individual plays.  Plus, since the festival runs over the best part of 2 weeks, there is no need to rush and get to see all 10 plays right away.

That said, I went to two plays Thursday night, both with religious…

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The Catholic Table- Emily Stimpson Chapman


During Lent I’ve been offering a series of lectures called Eucharistic Eating. This is part of an ongoing project(sadly my attempts to record it have not gone well), and I’m always on the lookout for more material on the topic. So, I was quite pleased when I came across The Catholic Table blog. Written by Emily Stimpson Chapman, a freelance Catholic writer and blogger.

Cover shot of Emily Stimpson Chapman’s The Catholic Table.

The Catholic Table is part memoir, part theological reflection, with a few recipes thrown in along the way. The tone of the book is light and breezy with occasional light touches of satire and sarcasm. Always gentle and never malicious. As a Catholic writer she makes good use of both Scripture and Tradition. Continue reading