Common Eating – Old and New Testament


I’ve decided that I would include both the Old and New Testament classes in this one post, even though they will make up separate weeks in the course itself.  One reason for doing it is an attempt to limit the number of posts that I am doing in connection with the course.  Another reason is that the design and lecture format for these two classes will most likely be very similar.

So, the OT first.  Among possible questions to be raised and discussed is the role of common eating in the sacrificial system and rules.  Places in the text where common eating plays into the narrative flow. Individual stories are also open to discussion, such as the whole story of Jacob taking Esau’s birthright for a bowl of stew, and the trickery of Jacob and Rebekah conspiring to fool Isaac, in both cases meals being served in solitary rather than in common settings.

Naturally the institution of the Passover will be covered, a topic which will be picked up a couple of weeks later in the context of the class on the Eucharist.  We will also lay some of the ground work on the subject of hospitality, which will also be picked up in more detail later on the course.  Individual stories are also open to discussion, such as the whole story of Jacob taking Esau’s birthright for a bowl of stew, and the trickery of Jacob and Rebekah conspiring to fool Isaac, in both cases meals being served in solitary rather than in common settings.

Inter-Testamental develops will also be given a place either at the end of the first class or at the beginning of the second.  When it comes to the New Testament, the primary focus will be on the experiences of common eating in the Gospel narratives.  Jesus eating with his disciples, Jesus eating with the Pharisees and other leaders, and Jesus eating with the outcasts and sinners.  Meals in other parts of the New Testament will also be referred to, and the class will end with a look at the Last Supper, setting up the next weeks discussion of the Eucharist.

Again, I welcome t comments.  You can comment in the comment section below or send me a tweet @anglibubs.

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