Donuts, Coffee, Beer N Chips


Despite the title making it seem like I may have some sort of culinary death wish, it’s simply a description of my day Saturday. I was up early and headed out to Fools + Horses. Fool + Horses is my favourite writing spot, and I was there to chronicle my experiences on the first day of ManyFest.

As I was getting ready in the morning I checked Facebook and saw a post from my friend Kent Dueck. It seemed he was involved in some kind of mini doughnut kind of truck. I hadn’t seen the truck on Friday, so as I was making my along Broadway towards Fools + Horses I kept my eyes open for the truck.

Sure enough as I walked by I saw Kent outside of the truck with a big broom and water. He was giving the truck a good washing down to make sure it was nice and bright looking for when the customers appeared.

Happy Doughnut

Caramel and Almond Mini donuts from Happy Donuts and Lemonade.

Donuts for Breakfast

I was able to get my post completed just after Manyfest opened at 11 o’clock. So, as I wandered my way down to the main Food Truck area, I stopped off at Happy Donuts and Lemonade, where Kent and Sandy were kind enough to treat me to a tray of the Caramel and Almond Donuts, as well as a taste of the single serve of the Coconut Dream and the Donutella. Continue reading

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Meltdown Grilled Cheese, Tia Maria’s Taqueria


It’s the second weekend of September and that means it’s time for Manyfest. Manyfest means it’s time for Food Truck Wars. This year there are 52 trucks entered. Although it may surprise some people, I won’t be trying them all. Instead I’m focusing on trucks like Meltdown Grilled Cheese and Tia Maria’s Taqueria, neither of which I’ve tried before.

The Meltdown menu

The menu sign for The Meltdown Gourmet Grilled Cheese.

To attempt to cover several trucks over the course of the weekend will require eating of epic, heroic, or simply foolish proportions. Fortunately, I’m on the scene with more stomach than sense. Continue reading

Underdogs Sports Bar – NFL Opener


The Sports Bar is an interesting type of place. On game day it’s a hive of activity. Fans fixated on the screens hanging all over the walls, cheering, booing, or groaning as they follow along with their favourite teams. Other times, when there’s nothing of significance happening in the sports world, they can be almost tomb like. I’ve experienced both ends of the spectrum when visiting Underdogs Sports Bar on Portage Avenue.

Underdogs sign

I don’t think it’s fair to compare the two groups. After all one group is incredibly childish, and the other is simply under the legal drinking age.

Underdogs in the Afternoon

My first visit to Underdogs came after I had been at a clergy gathering at St. Andrew’s Woodhaven. I wandered down Portage Avenue afterwards trying to decide where I wanted to stop for supper. I passed by a few options, a couple of which were closed and ended up at Underdogs. I knew I wouldn’t have to wait long for my meal, because there were only about four other people in a space that holds a couple of hundred. (kinda of like some Anglican Churches on a Sunday morning). Continue reading

Tipsy Cow with Le Burger Week Side


The Tipsy Cow is one of the newest entrants into the Winnipeg restaurant market. Located at 285 Portage Avenue, it’s the third restaurant to occupy that space in the last five years. I visited the space when it was La Bamba, but didn’t make it there when it was The Planit.

The Tipsy Cow chips

Chips with a beet cream cheese dip, from The Tipsy Cow Appetizer menu.

However, it is close at hand to Holy Trinity, and so needing a place that was close at hand the other day, I decided to give The Tipsy Cow a try. It also gave me an opportunity to make a token gesture towards Le Burger Week. With over 100 burgers on offer Le Burger Week seems to have gotten a little excessive, Continue reading

The Potlikker Papers – John T Edge


Earlier this spring, when I was doing my lecture series on Eucharistic Eating, one of the participants asked a question relating how the Eucharist was viewed in other cultural contexts. I didn’t have the answer to his question (my research is ongoing), but it did make me ask questions about my own reading experiences when it came to the subject of food.

Front cover of The Potlikker Papers

It seems to me, at times, that food writing is a particularly western, white, and privileged preoccupation. That may simply be due to my failure to find other writers. However, even a book like Mark Kurlansky’s Choice Cuts, shows a heavy tendency to lean in this direction.

I’ve tried to correct this somewhat in the intervening period. One thing I’ve done is become familiar with the work of Michael Twitty. The video below is a good introduction to some of his thinking.

There is a good selection of his videos available on YouTube, if you want to explore more.

One of the things the video above puts emphasis on is the need to credit that Black slave community for creations, Continue reading