Common Eating – 2 – Marking

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One of the important parts of Common Eating as a course, is finding ways for the students to work together. The only problem with this is that I have a natural aversion to anything that resembles a group project. This is in part because I am an introvert among introverts. I’m also very independent. On my two choice Enneagram test I scored an 88 as a number 5.

When it comes to an idea like a course on Common Eating, it may seem a little odd to start with laying out a marking structure before deciding on what shape I would like such a course to take.  My reasoning for doing this however, is before I go about the work of course design, it seems to me that I want to know if I can come up with something that will pass academic muster as well contain useful and practical information and skills for ministerial development.  As far as I’ve observed over the years, the two don’t have to exist in tandem with each other. Continue reading

Cousin’s Deli, Lounge – South Sherbrook


I never know where my mind will go when it starts to wander. Yesterday I was thinking about Cousin’s Deli, and writing this post, and I started to think about my dad. You see, yesterday marks eight years since my dad died. The reason Cousin’s got me thinking about dad, is that for the first seven years we lived in Winnipeg, we would drive pass Cousin’s on our way down to church at the Salvation Army Winnipeg Citadel.

pasta salad

The pasta salad is quite flavourful, but lacking in vegetables

We never stopped, it was just a marker on the route downtown. Much like the site of Harman’s meant that we were getting close. However, those rides, especially when it was just my dad and me, were times of good conversation, times when I had my dad all to myself. In a family of six boys that wasn’t all that frequent, even as I moved into my teen, university years.

I did have coffee and meal times out with my dad. As things have gone, only one of the three places we would regularly go still are open. Continue reading

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Landrigan: The Vegetarian’s Guide to Eating Meat


In a previous post, I mentioned that I had picked up the book while browsing through the “New and Noted” section at the Winnipeg Public Library. While I was browsing, I also picked up Marissa Landrigan’s book, The Vegetarian’s Guide to Eating Meat. Landrigan is an assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh-Johnstown, where she teaches creative, digital, and professional writing.

Marissa Landrigan Book cover

Cover shot of The Vegetarians Guide to Eating Meat, by Marissa Landrigan

The Vegetarian’s Guide to Eating Meat, subtitled, A Young Woman’s Search for Ethical Food, chronicles the author’s journey from a red headed Irish misfit in a large, extended, Irish-Italian family of meat eaters, to a vegetarian activist, to meat eater again. This isn’t the first book I’ve read related to our meat eating choices. The first being Tovar Cerulli’s The Mindful Carnivore: A Vegetarian’s Hunt for Sustenance and the second being Scott Gold’s The Shameless Carnivore: A Manifesto for Meat Lovers

Landrigan’s book is much closer in tone to Cerulli’s than it is to Gold’s. Gold tries to hard to be a comedian, and while claiming to have respect for vegetarians too often veers into sarcasm and mockery. Cerulli, on the other hand, focuses on the interconnected nature of all living plants and animals. The biggest difference between The Mindful Carnviore, and the Vegetarian’s Guide to Eating Meat, is: Cerulli has a greater emphasis on the relationships between human and biosphere, while Landrigan focuses more on the role of personal relationships among family and friends, and how they impacted her eating decisions. Continue reading

Red Ember Common – Forks Market


The Forks has long been one of my favourite places to stop into on my way to work. A Cinnamon bun from Tall Grass Prairie, always makes for a sweet start to the day, and if you hit The Forks at the right time of day, it can be a really quick spot for picking up a meal.

The Forks has been upgrading over the last couple of years, and the second phase of The Forks Market upgrade is in full swing. I am of mixed mind up this second phase. I plan on writing about this in another post. For now I’m going to write about Red Ember Common. I’ve been a fan of Red Ember almost since the truck first hit the streets.

Red Ember Seating

There is bar seating write by the restaurant, and the view is quite good from the Commons seating area.

The production area for Red Ember is quite impressive. The space has been renovated so that you can look in from three different sides and see the staff as they make their creations. This is an upgrade from the truck in that there is more room to be able to watch your pizza being made.

Red Ember Pizza and More

One of the first things I noticed about the menu is that there seem to be a few more non pizza options to go along with a somewhat larger selection of pizzas. I needed to make a trip back to The Forks to check on the names of which pizzas I had ordered, because the Red Ember Commons website isn’t operating. Continue reading

Singyun Chinese Restaurant – Provencher


I find myself going down Provencher Boulevard, both on foot and on bus, quite frequently. One restaurant that has often caught my eye is Singyun Chinese restaurant. Two things about it really catch the eye. The first is the exterior of the building which is a bright, lemon yellow, with signage that looks like it has seen much better days. The second is they advertise a lunch buffet, which for the longest time was $8.99 including a canned drink, but by the time I got around to trying it was $9.75.

Shingyun decor

The upper section of the restaurant looks like it was at one time a Mediterranean restaurant, and the new owners couldn’t afford or be bothered to change the decor.

Stepping inside the interior isn’t that much more inspiring. On the bottom level, where the buffet table is, there are three or four tables up against the window(I didn’t bother to count). Upstairs, which I didn’t visit until my third time here, it looks like you’ve stepped into an attempt to recreate the ambiance of a Mediterranean beach cafe. It appears like something out of the Cognitive Dissonance school of interior design.

Of course, I primarily go to restaurants for the food, and as it turns out, Singyun does that quite well.  Which is also a reminder to not let the decor throw me off. Continue reading

Pho Hoi An – Sargent Avenue


Pho Hoi An is a Vietnamese-Chinese restaurant located on Sargent Avenue. It’s one of a few restaurants in a little strip mall, and is right next door to the Village Diner. This is a restaurant that I’ve been to many years ago, but haven’t been to recently.

Pho Hoi An Vietnames Coffee

Vietnamese Coffee is always one of my favourite parts of a meal at a Vietnamese restaurant.

If you remember late last month there were several days where the weather alternated between light drizzle and heavy downpour. One of those evenings was September 22nd. The date sticks out in my mind because it was the night of a Bomber game and I was walking home looking for a place where I might get out of the rain and catch a little bit of the game.  Continue reading