Common Eating – The Meal Itself.

Featured


This post is probably the one that has changed the most since I wrote it. I originally thought that I wouldn’t bother with any textbook. However, I think I’m going to add a cookbook to the list. Not just any cookbook, but the More with Less cookbook. This cookbook is the greatest contribution of Mennonites to the world, well, greatest after Pioneer Farmers Sausage, and Shmaunt Fat.

I also think that I will need to provide material to point students on the best ways to purchase food for large groups of people. I often find that when I’ve shopped and thought that I might not have enough food, that the opposite is true and that I’ve purchased a fair bit more than I need. 

Common Eating potatoes

A cookie sheet full of roast potatoes is a good, simple cooking option. Cutting larger potatoes, rather than using minis will be a way to cut down on cost.

I would really appreciate it if people would leave comments as to how they have been able to overcome diverse eating habits in positive ways for all concerned.

If you’ve had a chance to read the previous posts in this series, you’ll have noticed an emphasis on the meal that begins each session.  This meal is intended to be the central part of the course.  I hope to accomplish several things in doing this.

Foremost, is the opportunity for students to get to know each other in a way that a normal seminary class may not allow.  The meal allows for something more than a coffee break, even a somewhat protracted one does, for  the building of relationships. Continue reading

Little Bangkok Thai, Shawarma Fusion – Cityplace


If you’re a reader of Dining with Donald, and not from the area, you may not know that Winnipeg gets cold. Real cold. Periodically this cold arrives for extended stays like it did from mid-December until the last couple of days, with only a minor respite in the middle.

Over the years Winnipeg developed a downtown walkway system that helps to take some of the bite out of the real cold weather. Generally I walk out of doors, but during these cold snaps I find myself taking advantage of this system on a more frequent basis.

Little Bangkok Thai Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Little Bangkok Thai soup

The Tom Yum soup from Little Bangkok Thai in the Cityplace food court.

There are many restaurants along the way. Included among them are the ones in the food courts at Portage Place, Cityplace, and Winnipeg Square. Of the three, Cityplace has become my favourite food court. The main thing about Cityplace is that they seem to have the best mix of chain and local establishments. I rarely visit the chains with the exception of Za Pizza Bistro, which is a local chain.

Over the last few weeks I’ve visited two food court tenants. One is what appears to be locally owned LIttle Bangkok Thai, Continue reading

Advertisements

Browns Socialhouse Portage Avenue


Browns Socialhouse describes itself as an upscale casual dining restaurant. It’s a largely western Canada chain. According to their website there is one location in Ontario.

By and large it’s a glorified sports bar. Sort of like Underdogs, but with better furniture. That is to say there are TVs all over the place including a giant screen one over the bar that consists of several smaller large screens (if that’s not an onxymoron). There are three locations here in Winnipeg, but my visits were all made to the one on Portage Avenue, downtown, across Portage Avenue from the highest bidder naming rights arena.

Browns Socialhouse coaster

A beermat/coaster from Browns Socialhouse.

If you come from the corner of Donald and Portage, you walk past the outdoor patio (which for some reason is empty this time of year). It’s a bit odd as you enter the building. You don’t enter the restaurant directly, but enter the building it’s situated in, and then hang a right at the security desk to get into the restaurant itself.

The restaurant is quite large and open, with high ceilings. It’s divided into different sections. Continue reading

Joe Average Buys Groceries


The New Year is upon us, and I am starting it off with a post inspired by activity in the Manitoba Food Bloggers group at the very end of last year. Group moderator and organizer and generally all-round terrific person Shel Zolkewich, posted a poll which stated that according to Stats Canada, the average Manitoba family spent $241.00 per person per month on food.

Now, I eat out a lot, but I thought this might be an interesting experiment to attempt. This is not my first attempt at some sort of budgeted eating. I did a $20.00 a week Lenten challenge a few years back, and more recently I did the Winnipeg Harvest poverty pledge.

Average Joe Grocery bill

ill $51.11 is the total of my first shop for the month.

So, on one level, I know how easy it is to live off of $241.00 for groceries for a month. However both of those other times were based on the idea of restriction. Limiting myself to a certain amount of calories. Giving myself a small, almost infinitesimal idea of what it is like to live daily with the bare minimum or even less.

This, on the other hand, Continue reading

My Favourite Crime-Fighting Foodies


This idea behind this post first started working it’s way into my mind about a year ago. While I was preparing my Lent course, I started to think about food and books, and particularly about food and detective fiction, my favourite type of fiction.

I’ve been reading and watching a lot of detective fiction over the last year. Mainly, I admit, watching as I try and work my way ? through whole series using the Winnipeg Public Library.

I was further encouraged in this direction when I visited Pho Yo a couple of weeks ago. I picked up Diane Mott Davidson’s, Catering to Nobody. I’ve finished this book, and I think I’ll give a few more a try. Although, when the lead character suggested that as far as Szechuan food was concerned, she thought that spicy food was concerned spicy food should be left to the Mexicans, I was tempted to hurl the book against the wall. However, I stuck it out, and can only hope the lead character’s palate improves as the series goes along.

Food figures to varying degrees in detective series. For one thing, it’s a great conveyance for poison. Strong Poison, by Dorothy Sayers, is just one example of such a case. Sayers created Wimsey at a time when she was poor and claimed to have made him incredibly wealthy so that she could indulge in the culinary fantasies she herself couldn’t afford. This is a common thread in many Golden Age detectives. Sayers herself developed into quite a gourmand later in life and enjoyed good food and fine wine for the remainder of her life.

My favourite Brussels Sprouts

Criminally good Brussels Sprouts with bacon. Cooked nigh to perfection. Part of a wonderful Christmas Dinner at my brother and sister-in-laws place.

Continue reading

Pho Yo Vietnamese Cuisine


The lead up to Christmas is one of my busy times as a priest. In addition to added services, I have a few more visits to make as opposed to the rest of the year. Being out and about more than usual, I try to fit in stops at some restaurants that I haven’t hit before. One such place is Pho Yo Vietnamese Cuisine on St. Mary’s Road.

Pho Yo is in the space that was once occupied by Simon’s Cuisine. Simon’s has since moved to the Forks, and rebranded itself as Empanadas and Company.

Pho Yo Pho.

The eponymous dish from Pho Yo.

I can’t count the number of times I’ve been by this location without stopping in. I didn’t visit Simon’s until it opened in The Forks, and it’s only in the last couple of weeks that I’ve stopped in to visit Pho Yo. Continue reading